Beware the Sin of Sodom

Sin is a tricky thing.  It is always easier to see it in someone else than in ourselves.  A case in point is found in the Genesis story of Abram/Abraham and Lot.  You recall in the Abraham story that Abraham split the land with Lot.  Lot took the best, well-watered ground and Abraham was left with less desirable holdings.  Lot wound up living in the city of Sodom, whose rather prophetic name may be translated as “flaming” or “burnt.”

Sodom was indeed a wicked place.  God told Abraham that if he found 50 righteous men in all of Sodom, he would not destroy it as he had planned.  Abraham knew that was unlikely, and immediate set out to lower the required number.  To his credit, Abraham was trying to save his nephew and his family.  Perhaps the thought of so much death was frightening to Abraham.  God finally agreed to withhold his judgment against Sodom for the sake of 10 righteous people.

But that didn’t happen.

Most conservative Christians will point to a single issue as the trigger point of Sodom’s downfall: the apparent call for homosexual rape against Lot’s angelic visitors.  But that was merely one facet of Sodom’s sin.  Since not even 10 righteous people were found within its walls, it was a sin–or a suite of sins–shared by a population.  In Ezekiel 16 the prophet relates the words of God, “48 As I live, declares the Lord GOD, your sister Sodom and her daughters have not done as you and your daughters have done.  49  Behold, this was the guilt of your sister Sodom: she and her daughters had pride, excess of food, and prosperous ease, but did not aid the poor and needy.  50  They were haughty and did an abomination before me. So I removed them, when I saw it.”

Of all the pertinent applicable lessons that could be learned from these three verses, I offer this:  Beware the sin of Sodom.  Today more than ever, we need to examine ourselves individually and as a nation.  Are we following in the ways of Sodom?  I am not speaking about the misplaced emphasis on homosexuality.  I am talking specifically about what God said through Ezekiel.

Having only the experience of being born in this country and living here all my life, I can only address my perception of this nation.  From our popular music to our bumper stickers, we are proud of our nation.  “I’m proud to be an American…”  And I can agree with some of that.  But when that pride prevents us from examining our faults and flaws, our policies and laws, our pride has become our downfall.  We are not perfect.  To declare ourselves perfect arrogates perfection: we claim what can never be reality in a fallen universe.

We have excess of food—or at least some do.  We are so careless and uncaring toward the needs of others that we have made food into sport.  We have eating contests where the object is nothing but thinly veiled gluttony.  We support all you can eat buffets, and the majority of the super-sized patrons of those establishments do not need to be there.  (As a person who has struggled with weight all my life, I’m talking to myself.)  We throw phenomenal amounts of food away.  When we have the means and opportunity to help feed a child or a destitute neighbor, our lawmakers opt to save money and cut aid to the needy.

While our people may work a lot, some say more than other industrialized countries, we do still have an enormous amount of leisure time.  The leisure industry spans electronics to motion pictures to sports, to recreational vehicles and travel resorts.  We focus more on our own leisure than on the survival of the less fortunate.

Sodom was prosperous, “but did not aid the poor and needy.”  God’s words.  They were haughty, and in their prideful arrogance, did “an abomination”, which was unspecified in the passage in Ezekiel.

God’s solution: “I removed them.”

That is a chillingly understated comment, if we take the Genesis account as true.  Sodom, and its sister city on the plain, Gomorrah, were utterly destroyed.

When we consider where we are, how we live, what we do, it is so important that we wake up and realize that as a nation, we are precariously close to Sodom.  But there is an answer to this condition.  God told Israel through the prophet Isaiah in the first chapter if his message, “16 Wash yourselves; make yourselves clean; remove the evil of your deeds from before my eyes; cease to do evil, 17 learn to do good; seek justice, correct oppression; bring justice to the fatherless, plead the widow’s cause.”

When we cling to our perceived rights to things like firearms and fail to feed a hungry child, we are guilty of the sin of Sodom.  When we allow the sick to suffer because we are reluctant to regulate skyrocketing costs or pay for care, we are guilty of the sin of Sodom.  When we support an economic system that entrenches the poor in abject poverty and sends the vast majority of all of the wealth to a privileged few, we are guilty of the sin of Sodom.

The sin of Sodom was not merely sexual.  It was the systematic, predatory oppression of those without power.

In a favorite passage in Micah 6, the prophet speaks for God, saying, “8 He has told you, O man, what is good; and what does the LORD require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?”  Justice is equivalent to righteousness in much of the Old Testament writings.  Are we practicing true righteous justice in seeing that the needs of all are met before any take more?  Kindness as rendered here is also seen as mercy, elsewhere.  How merciful is it to allow money to take precedence over people, whittling away at safety nets and forcing the most vulnerable into the darker indignity of poverty?  The humility of walking with God is far from the pride we exude on a daily basis.

God defined the sin of Sodom for us.  And all we have to do to see it is look in the mirror, collectively speaking.

But sin is a tricky thing.  It is always easier to see it in someone else than in ourselves.

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