Memorial Day, 2016: On War and Peace

(The following began as a social media post, but I thought I might preserve it here on the blog, with a few additional thoughts.)

Today is a day of remembrance in America. There is the usual casting of aspersions toward those who fail to acknowledge the intent of the observance of this holiday. For some, there emerges if only for the day an almost palpable nationalism that some see as patriotism but others may come to fear.

I do not in any way wish to minimize the importance and significance of the sacrifice that so many have made across the various conflicts we have found ourselves collectively engaged in over the centuries of our history, whether in service to a political ideal or in support of basic human dignity and freedom. Most of those things have been worthy, necessary, or both.

In too many conflicts, civilians have paid an equal or greater price. In World War II, the total military death count may have been around 23.5 million. Civilian deaths as a result of military actions on all sides and including war-related disease outbreaks and famine may have added in excess of 50 million more deaths to the total count. When do we remember those people?

As long as there is the quest for power; as long as there is the rallying cry of extremist ideology; as long as human life is held in such low regard that death is dealt as a tool of subjugation that must be countered with more death to defeat it, we will have wars. Young men–and now young women–will be sent into harm’s way to defend against an ever-growing evil and disregard for the value and sanctity of life.

Like so many others, I dream of a world without hate, where wars are no longer necessary; where life and peace are valued above power and control; where security is measured not in guns and bombs but in freedom from want and in the full expression of basic human rights.

I believe that this is more in line with a life of faith than what I see in so many who claim to be children of God.  While I understand the position that many hold, that their affinity for guns and deep reverence for the military is rooted in the idea that they are willing to defend their constitutionally guaranteed rights and professed faith even to a violent end, I cannot help but wonder if that is truly in accordance with John’s three word declaration of the nature of God, that “God is love.”  (Yes, I know that Jesus said, “Greater love has no one than this, that someone lay down his life for his friends.”  But Jesus laid down his life without raising a weapon–unless, of course, the love he demonstrated in that act could be construed as the ultimate “weapon” to overcome hate.)

Personally, I cannot “celebrate” Memorial Day, only observe it. I ache for the loss of too many bright young people who may have brought great things to the world had they not been cut down too soon. Their sacrifice, while so deeply appreciated and understood, should drive us toward building a world where no more good young people–civilian or military–must die. A peace secured through superior fire power or through mutually assured destruction is no peace at all, merely capitulation to the baser elements of a fallen, flawed humanity.

Let us remember the fallen, but let us always work toward a future where fewer must die, where our celebrations are more for achievements toward peace and equality and toward service to better life, not recounting the emptiness and sadness of loss.